Friday, December 14, 2018

Floating Yellow Curtains

If you've seen one of our aerial photos of the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project, you might have noticed what look like yellow lines in the reservoir. Those are turbidity curtains. What's that?

We're glad you asked.  A turbidity curtain, also known as a silt curtain, is a floating barrier that collects suspended solids that are present in the water and allows them to settle in a contained area.

Calaveras Reservoir, and our turbidity curtains, are visible below.



Turbidity curtains are usually placed near areas were we have disturbed soil in or near the reservoir. The turbidity curtains act as a floating filter to protect the water around the outlet tower where we take water out of the reservoir. Although we filter this water at the nearby Sunol Valley Water Treatment Plant before we serve it to our customers, these curtains add an additional layer of protection to our water supply from any particulates or sediment from the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project.

The top of the curtain is made from a float from which a skirt hangs down. There are generally two types of turbidity curtains: hanging and standing silt curtains. At the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project we use hanging silt curtains.





Image curiosity of : https://www.landmsupplyco.com/







A close up of our turbidity curtains.


Turbidity curtains are an important part of the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project to continue to protect our our water sources during construction.



See you around the Valley!

Friday, November 30, 2018

Photo Friday - Morning Light


Happy Photo Friday

It's been a while since we posted any photos from Pat, one of our Watershed Keepers who helps look after our Alameda Watershed lands.

Recently Pat found himself at San Antonio Reservoir at sunrise and shared the moment with all of us. 



Have a great weekend, and see you around the Valley!

Friday, November 16, 2018

Alameda Whipsnake Sightings Near You

Here in the Sunol Valley we have a special species of snake that lives among us. It’s no other than the Alameda whipsnake or sometimes called the Alameda Striped Racer, (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus), a subspecies of the California whipsnake (Masticophis lateralis). It has made the coastal scrub, chaparral, and grassland habitats in the hills east of the San Francisco Bay its habitat.

Known for its ability to move fast, the Alameda whipsnake has the following distinct features: broad head, large eyes and a long slender body with a distinct yellow-orange “racing stripe” down each side. Adults can grow to six feet long. They are diurnal which means that they are active mainly during the day. Surprisingly good climbers, these snakes seem to prefer to hunt for lizards, snakes, and frogs. They are not venomous and pose no threat to humans.

All of the workers on SFPUC-related construction projects in the Valley have been trained to be on the look out for these special snakes. If they see one, they stop what they're doing, and contact a trained biologist to rescue them to a safer location.



Here is an up and close picture of one rescued by our field biologist, Aaron.

November is the time of year when they look for a dry, safe burrow to hibernate during the winter. The springtime is when courtship and mating takes place, usually from late-March through mid-June.



Alameda whipsnakes are considered to be both a federally and state threatened species.









See you around the Valley!

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Spraying it Green

Most of us don’t give hydroseeding much thought. As it turns out, we at the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project do.

Hydroseeding is, in essence, spreading seeds over an area after the ground has been disturbed by things like the construction of a large dam.  It is an important part of restoration and erosion control.  What is cool is the way we plant these seeds.  What we call hydroseeding was invented in the 1950's and involves mixing mulch, seed, and water together to form a slurry and then literally spraying it on the ground. This mixture increases the likelihood of germination of the plants and it holds firm to sloped areas.

One of the best times to hydroseed is the fall, which is why our teams are spending a lot of time hydroseeding now.  Our hydroseed is a mix of native annual and perennial grasses and forbs that grow quickly and easily from seed. The restoration goals for the project include establishing native plant communities. The vegetation provides habitat for threatened species and helps improve water quality.


Here is a beautiful picture of the recent hydroseeding of Borrow Area B (BAB). The green color is not green grass but a natural dye used so the contractor can track locations where they applied the hydroseed. The color will eventually disappear until the vegetation begins to grow. 






And, here is a picture of the newly hyroseeded dam. You can see the hydroseeder (truck) spraying the hydroseed onto the dam's face.  The thick lines are straw wattles used to prevent erosion on the slope.




Here is a closer picture of one of our workers spraying the hydroseed onto a steep slope.

Now we just need a nice winter's rain to help the hydroseed grow. 

See you around the Valley!

Monday, November 5, 2018

Calaveras Road Closure Extended until December 31, 2018



The Closure of Calaveras Road to through traffic between Milpitas and Sunol has been extended from Friday, November 2, 2018 to Monday, December 31, 2018.

The road will reopen to all traffic, weekdays, weekends, and holidays starting Tuesday, January 1, 2019.

Why:
SFPUC has completed the repairs to last winter’s landslide and we are now working to obtain the necessary approvals to open Calaveras road to the public.

Background:
We have been working since 2011 to replace the 93 year-old Calaveras Dam to increase the reliability of the Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System, which serves 2.7 million people in four Bay Area counties.

The closure of Calaveras Road began in July 2016 to protect public safety on the extremely narrow portions of Calaveras Road while large trucks utilized the road for construction.  

Road Closure Details:
Where: Calaveras Road just south of Geary Road (entrance to Sunol Regional Wilderness) to Oakridge Road near the Alameda /Santa Clara County line.

When: 
July, 2016 through December 31, 2018. The Road will be open on weekdays, weekends, and holidays starting Tuesday, January 1, 2019.

For more information, visit sfwater.org/calaverasroad

Thank you for your continued patience. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Friday, October 26, 2018

Love Your Local Stilling Basin

We have written a great deal about the spillway at the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project. Completed in 2016, this spillway is the width of a six lane freeway, and the height of a three-story building. The spillway's job is to protect Calaveras Dam by allowing water from Calaveras Reservoir to flow safely around, and away from, the dam in extreme high water events.

We have neglected to highlight an important component of a spillway - the stilling basin. Today, we'd like to generate a little love for stilling basins.  



A stilling basin is a structure that dissipates the energy of the water rushing down the spillway. Without a stilling basin, water coming out of the spillway could scour out the foundation of the dam, the base of the spillway, and nearby creek beds. In short, the stilling basin is a sort of bodyguard for the dam.

Stilling basins come in a variety of types, but generally fall into two categories: a straight drop for lower elevations, or an inclined chute. The stilling basin at the new Calaveras Dam is an example of the latter category. To be specific, it is a United States Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) Type II stilling basin.  Our stilling basin is approximately 200 feet long, 45 feet high and 80 feet wide.    


Water flowing down the new spillway of the new Calaveras Dam will drop 200 feet in elevation before it reaches the stilling basin at the bottom.The stilling basin creates a hydraulic jump to slow down the high velocity water before it slowly, and safely, discharges into Calaveras Creek.

A view of the new stilling basin at the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project

So, let's hear it for the humble stilling basin!

See you around the Valley! 

Friday, October 19, 2018

Loma Prieta Earthquake Anniversary Week - The New Irvington Tunnel

Happy Friday

This week marks the anniversary of the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake. 

We've been blogging about the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission's efforts to seismically upgrade our water system for many years now. The $4.8 billion Water System Improvement Program is more than 96% complete as of this writing. The water system that supplies water to 2.7 million customers in four Bay Area counties is much more earthquake ready today than it was 5 years ago. 

In honor of the Loma Prieta Anniversary week, we wanted to remember a post from October of 2013 when a crucial seismic project for the Water System Improvement Program achieved a huge milestone. Final hole through. 


Miners worked long hours in the New Irvington Tunnel .

The New Irvington Tunnel Project ,which went into service in February 2015, is a new 3.5 mile long seismically designed tunnel. We mined the tunnel from different directions, and the moment the two teams met underground to complete the digging is called Final Hole Through.

See the October 2013 Story here.


One of the three road headers that excavated the New Irvington Tunnel.

Have a great weekend, everyone.

See you around the Valley!

Friday, October 5, 2018

Calaveras Dam Embankment Celebration- Photo Friday


The replacement Calaveras Dam has reached its full height of 220 feet.

The month of September marked a huge milestone for the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project.  The new replacement earth and rock fill dam has finally reached its full height and is nearly ready to begin impounding water this winter. 

You might have read about it or seen it on the news.  We had many media outlets out at the dam on September, 21, 2018 to cover the occasion.  


Here are some photo highlights in honor of Photo Friday.


















San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Vice President Vince Courtney addressing the crowd.



Sharon Tapia, DSOD, Division Chief addressing the crowd.  DSOD or California's Division of Safety of Dams regulate dams in California.  They were a key partner in the construction of Calaveras Dam. 


















General Manager Harlan L. Kelly, Jr., was joined by SFPUC Commissioners, SFPUC Deputy General Managers, and representatives from the Bay Area Water Supply and Conservation Agency to make it official with a ribbon cutting. 




Here is the entire Calaveras Dam Replacement Project Team atop the new dam.








The project isn't completed, however. The crew will work on completing the approach channel, constructing access and roadways throughout the site, restoration and revegetation, placing instruments, and installing gates and security systems. 

The overall project is 94% complete and is scheduled to be completed in spring 2019.


See you around the valley!



Thursday, September 27, 2018

Calaveras Road Closure Extended through November 2, 2018



The Closure of Calaveras Road to through traffic between Milpitas and Sunol has been extended from September 30, 2018 to Friday, November 2, 2018.

The road will reopen to all traffic, weekdays, weekends, and holidays starting Saturday, November 3, 2018.

Why:

The SFPUC has been working with the appropriate county agencies to secure final approval for renewed public access to the road after a portion of the road was built by the SFPUC to replace a portion undermined by a landslide.

Background:

We have been working since 2011 to replace the 93 year-old Calaveras Dam to increase the reliability of the Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System, which serves 2.7 million people in four Bay Area counties.

The closure of Calaveras Road began in July 2016 to protect public safety on the extremely narrow portions of Calaveras Road while large trucks utilized the road for construction.  

Road Closure Details:

Where: Calaveras Road just south of Geary Road (entrance to Sunol Regional Wilderness) to Oakridge Road near the Alameda /Santa Clara County line.

When: July, 2016 through November 2, 2018. The Road will be open on weekdays, weekends, and holidays starting Saturday, November 3, 2018.

For more information, visit sfwater.org/calaverasroad

Thank you for your continued patience. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Friday, September 14, 2018

The Rainbow Trout Count


It is that time again. Time for the Trout Count. Biologists with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission have been working to estimate the total number of adult rainbow trout living in Calaveras Reservoir.



Sunol biologist Randy Renn trolling for fish on the reservoir.

Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are a cold water species native to the rivers and lakes of North America. Like all native fishes, it’s important to preserve them and our ecological systems. Monitoring fish populations is an important part of protecting trout in Calaveras Reservoir.



Here is a good specimen from Calaveras Reservoir.


How do the biologists estimate the rainbow trout population size?

They use a technique known as mark and recapture. During spring, when adult rainbow trout migrate from the reservoir upstream to Arroyo Hondo to spawn, the biologists capture and mark as they can. During summer, after the adult fish move back down into the reservoir, the biologists fish for them and check for tags. Knowing how many trout were originally tagged in Arroyo Hondo, they can use the ratio of tagged to untagged fish caught in the reservoir to estimate the total number that are there.

Pictured here is Scott Chenu SFPUC Sunol biologist, with one of his catches.



Our dedicated biologists will continue track the fish through the end of September. After Calaveras Reservoir is refilled, they will check the population size again to see if there is a difference. 

Periodically tracking the rainbow trout population size is also important because it helps our biologists determine whether they are healthy and thriving or being negatively impacted by reservoir operations.


See you around the valley!



















Friday, August 31, 2018

Photo Friday from Sunol Long Term Improvements

Happy Photo Friday!

The team working on our Sunol Long Term Improvements Project has been tasked with constructing a new corporation yard and offices to house SFPUC Water Supply and Treatment and Natural Resources staff near Sunol. These new facilities replace the old corporation yard and buildings, which were aging and in need of upgrading.  The teams housed here operate the East Bay water system as well as monitor the rights of way and 35,000 acres of SFPUC-owned watershed lands.

We dedicate this photo Friday to the tremendous progress the team has made this year.



Here is a view of the new administration building.

Workers are installing a new bioswale to catch and absorb water run off at the site.








And, here is a very modern looking canopy for equipment to be installed outside of the shop.

The Sunol Long Term Improvement Project is 75% complete. The project is expected to be completed by the end of 2018. 

During construction, the Sunol Water Temple will remain closed to the general public.

We hope you have a great Labor Day weekend! See you around the Valley!

Thursday, August 23, 2018

Thank you, Jordan Erickson

Meet Jordan Erickson. He is a native of Maple Grove, Minnesota and was with us this summer as a student intern. Jordan is currently studying civil engineering at Iowa State University. During the summer. He was an integral part of the Sunol Yard Long Term Improvement Project team. Last week was his last week on the job.



He said that working as an intern for the SFPUC gave him a better perspective on the type of work he'll be doing in the future. One the most valuable things that it taught him was the importance of communication between the contractor and the owner.

When he is not busy working, Jordan enjoys playing sports and hanging out with his friends. We wish Jordan another successful year at Iowa State University.

Jordan is one of dozens of summer interns we at the SFPUC are delighted to host each summer. They are all fantastic, like Jordan. It is extremely important to help support the growth of future leaders in our industry.

The entire staff at the Sunol Yard Long Term Improvement Project would like to thank Jordan for all of his hard work.

See you around the Valley!





Friday, August 17, 2018

An Ode to Cows


Summer is fire season in the Sunol Valley and the Alameda Creek Watershed. And as fires blaze across Northern California, and flare up closer to home, we’re reminded of an unsung cadre of fire prevention specialists on SFPUC lands: Cows.



















Cows have grazed the Alameda Creek Watershed since the mid-1800s. Our Watershed Managers at the SFPUC use a twenty-first century approach to this century’s old tool to help minimize fire danger on the 36,000 acres of land we own in the Alameda Creek Watershed.

Our rangeland managers apply sustainable and cutting-edge cattle management practices, an the cows’ hungry habits do a great job of keeping the grasses low, which reduces the potential fuel for fires.

When driving through the watershed, please stay on paved areas and away from high grasses that could catch fire from the underside of your car.

And if, while you’re there, you happen to see any of our four-legged fire prevention team members, say thanks. For all of us.

For more local resources on fire safety:


See you around the Valley! And be fire safe out there.



Members our four-legged Fire Prevention Team near San Antonio Reservior. Their appetite keeps grasses from growing into a fire hazard. 

Friday, August 10, 2018

Meet the CAT-773

Our work at the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project wouldn’t be possible without the help of heavy equipment. Heavy equipment helps our team complete big tasks like moving 12 million cubic yards of rock and earth. Because of the size and scope of our project, we have the privilege of working with some big and cool heavy equipment on our job site.

On any given day we could have approximately 20 pieces of heavy equipment operating. Today I would like to introduce you to the CAT-773



Here is a picture of some of our equipment.


With a full load it can carry 100 tons of dirt or 200,000 pounds of material. This machine can climb steep roads and is very comfortable for the operator. It has a 12-cylinder engine that can reach 42 miles an hour.


















John Rocca, Field Operations Manager in front of a CAT-773.

It’s a real life Tonka truck. We have a total of 10 CAT-773’s on site hauling material and getting the job done.

 This equipment belongs to our Joint Venture (Dragados, Sukut and Flatiron), our partners on this project.

See you around the Valley!

Friday, July 27, 2018

Meet Glen Gorski, Lead Quality Assurance Inspector


















As the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project starts to wind down, we'd like to focus on some of the key people that have played a crucial role in the construction of the replacement Dam. 

This week we'd like to introduce you to Glen Gorski. He is the Lead Quality Assurance Inspector for the project. A big part of his job is to ensure that the project is being built correctly. 

He and his team are tasked with observing and reporting that quality control measures are effective, so that the entire dam project is being constructed to the expectation of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission.  He is a wealth of information and insight and he knows every detail of the dam's construction. If you have a question, Glen will always have the correct answer.
.


Here is Glen with his team.


Glen has over 40 years of experience in the construction industry. He has quite a resume with two Bachelor of Science degrees in Engineering and Geology from the University of Notre Dame and one Masters of Science in Civil Engineering from Notre Dame and a Masters of Science in Business Administration from the University of Indiana. He started his career as a geotechnical engineer for the Scilts Graves & Associates. 


He says that the biggest lesson learned in his career is the importance of "paying attention to the contract." Paying attention to the contract will save you plenty of headaches in the long run. Out of the plethora of projects he's worked on throughout his career he says that the most interesting one is his work at Snoqualmie Falls where he was refurbishing a hydro electric power plant built in 1895.

When he is not working at the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project, you can find him volunteering at his local Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) group, golfing, leading a Boy Scout troop, or spending time with his grandchildren.



Glen enjoying the great outdoors.


The team at the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project would like to thank Glen for his commitment to excellence. 


See you around the valley!

Friday, July 20, 2018

Photo Friday - Calaveras

Happy Photo Friday

Here are a couple of shots from the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project taken this week.




The dam itself is growing higher and higher on the lower left. A portion of the existing dam is shrinking lower and lower on the center right as crews excavate the approach channels. 


On the new dam itself, crews use large equipment to transport and compact the materials for the earth and rock fill dam, as well do hand work, such as vacuuming the foundation of clay core of the new dam. Why vacuum? To ensure a solid connection between the core and the bedrock and protect the integrity of the new dam.


Have a great weekend, everyone! And see you around the Valley!

Friday, July 13, 2018

Sikorsky 58-JT helicopter at Alameda Creek Diversion Dam

Our teams have used many different kinds of equipment to build a fish ladder and other appurtenances at our Fish Passage Facilities within the Alameda Creek Watershed Project.

This past Monday, July 9, 2018, however, was a first: crews used a Sikorsky 58-JT helicopter. Why? The project site is remote, and the item to be transported was large.

Specifically, the contractor needed to move a 600-pound electrical box to an abutment of the remote Alameda Creek Diversion Dam. The helicopter picked up the electrical box at the staging area, located at the cattle corral and then lifted it to the left abutment of the Diversion Dam, which is located on SFPUC-owned property adjacent to the East Bay Regional Park District's Sunol Regional Wilderness.

A Sikorsky 58-JT  Helicopter makes quick work of transporting a 600 pound electrical box to the Alameda Creek Diversion Dam

The operation took just 20 minutes.

The Fish Passage Project is located in Sunol. The goal of the project is to provide for safe passage of fish around the Alameda Creek Diversion Dam to support the restoration of the Steelhead Trout to the Alameda Creek Watershed. 




The Alameda Creek Diversion Dam is visible in the distance. The electrical control building is located to the left. The project is at 92% completion and is expected to be finished this fall. 

The project is part of the SFPUC’s $4.48 billion Water System Improvement Program.

See you around the Valley!



Attention Sunol Regional Park Users:
Camp Ohlone Road will be closed to the pubic
Monday, July 16th-Wednesday, July 18th
Plan on using either Canyon View or Estes Trail 
to get to Little Yosemite.


Thursday, June 28, 2018

Meet Manny Yeboah

Meet Emmanuel (Manny) Yeboah. Manny has been an employee of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) for over 10 years. He started his career with the SFPUC's Bureau of Environmental Management preparing categorical exemptions and mitigation monitoring reports. Currently, Manny is an Office Engineer for the Fish Passage/ACDD project and a Project Construction Manager for the Sunol Nursery Project. As a Project Construction Manager, Manny ensures that the project is running on time, on budget and that the Contractor’s operations comply with the contract specifications, drawings and permits.

He and his team are responsible for constructing the first nursery project of its kind for SFPUC. The Sunol Nursery Project is a $2.2 million dollar project located within the Sunol Temple yard. The new Sunol Nursery encompasses 1-acre and includes construction of new water storage tanks, garage, office building, shade house and a state of the art greenhouse structure with a cooling pad system. The purpose of this project is to propagate plants for the Alameda Creek Watershed Center, Sunol Yard and other SFPUC projects. The project is scheduled to be completed by October 2018.

Manny enjoys his role as a Project Construction Manager. When asked about his role as a Project Construction Manager he stated, "It’s a huge accomplishment to be in this position, I’ve worked hard throughout the years and now my goals are coming into fruition with me running an innovative project for the SFPUC."

Manny is no stranger to construction projects. He has worked as an office engineer for over 6 years and has a degree in Urban Studies Regional Planning from Cal State Northridge. When he is not working, Manny enjoys going to new restaurants, working out, and spending time with family.

If you ever see him around the valley, don't hesitate to say hello.

Friday, June 15, 2018

What's the Big Deal about an Approach Channel?

We are building a new earth and rock fill Calaveras Dam right next to the existing 93 year-old dam (directly downstream of the existing dam as they say in the dam industry.)  As many of our previous blog posts have been tracking, we have been busy building the new dam, foot by foot, from the bottom up like a layer cake. A very large layer cake.

Our Calaveras cake is high enough now to allow us to begin to excavate out the approach channel to the new dam this week.

"What is an approach channel?" you ask. An approach channel is a breaching of an existing dam in order for its adjacent reservoir to come in contact with it. We will remove a portion of the existing dam (500,000 cubic yards of it to be exact) to allow reservoir water to eventually fill in the space between the old dam and the new dam. The old dam will look like a peninsula in the reservoir when the project is done. 

"Why not remove the old dam in its entirety?" We don't have to. Complete removal would be expensive, environmentally difficult, and not necessary to operate the reservoir. 

The start of excavation of the approach channel means that we have reached a high enough elevation with the new dam to safely begin carving out a huge chunk of the existing dam. It's a coming of age for the new dam, if you will. A significant milestone. 

Here is what the approach channel looked like at the beginning of last week.



And, here is what it looks like this week.




The channel will be lined with large rocks called rip rap to protect it from erosion so the channel will be ready when we start to refill the reservoir this fall.


Approach channels may not seem exciting at first glance, but we at the SFPUC are thrilled!

See you around the valley!

Friday, June 8, 2018

Photo Friday at the Bay Division Pipelines

Happy Photo Friday!

We've been neglecting the Bay Division Pipelines in our East Bay Photo Series. So we thought we'd celebrate this Photo Friday with a couple of construction shots - from 1966.

Five Bay Division Pipelines transmit Hetch Hetchy and East Bay supplies through our two Irvington Tunnels to our 2.7 million Bay Area Customers.  Bay Division Pipelines 1,2, and the newest addition - 5 connect to a brand new water tunnel under San Francisco Bay on their way to the Peninsula.

Pipelines 3 and 4 pass through the South Bay overland on their way to the Peninsula. 




As you can tell, these are large pipelines. They are also crucial to our water transmission system.


We can't blame those kids. We think they're pretty cool, too!

See you around the Valley!


Monday, June 4, 2018

SFPUC Project Team Leads National Discussion about Dams and Ecosystems

In early April members of the Fish Passage Facilities project team went to Miami, Florida to present at the 38th United States Society of Dam’s (USSD) Annual Conference on behalf of SFPUC. This year's conferences theme was A Balancing Act: Dams, Levees and Ecosystems. It focused on the importance of environmentally sustainable water projects within diverse and sometimes fragile ecosystems.

Our Fish Passage Facilities team were selected to present their paper called "Fish Passage Facilities at the Alameda Creek Diversion Dam, Final Design and Construction Update."

The Fish Passage Project is located in Sunol.  The goal  project is to provide for safe passage of fish around the Alameda Creek Diversion Dam to support the restoration of Steelhead trout to the Alameda Creek Watershed.  The project is part of the SFPUC's $4.8 billion Water System Improvement Project (WSIP) to repair, and seismically upgrade portion of the Hetch Hetchy Regional Water Sytem. Construction is expected to be completed in fall 2018.

Below is a photo of our fabulous four presenters: Eric Gee, Project Manager, Yen Ng, Engineer and Karl Tingwald, (former AECOM) civil engineer and Dan Wade, Director of Water Infrastructure Capital Projects and Programs.



We want to congratulate the Fish Passage team members for a job well done.

See you around the valley!



Friday, May 25, 2018

Memorial Day 2018












In observance of Memorial Day, our construction teams at the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project, Fish Passage Facilities within the Alameda Creek Watershed (within EBRPD's Sunol Regional Wilderness) and the Sunol Valley Long Term Improvements (Water Temple) will not be working on Monday, May 30th.

Here is a photo of one of our D4 Dozer's working on the dam’s core at the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project.



We hope all of you have a safe and wonderful Memorial Day weekend.

See you around the valley!

Friday, May 18, 2018

Happy Infrastructure Week 2018

The Week of May 14 to May 21st is national Infrastructure Week! This is the week where public agencies across the nation highlight the importance of our nation’s infrastructure, and the need to maintain it.

At the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, our ratepayers had the foresight more than 10 years ago to allow us to pass the $4.8 billion Water System Improvement Program (WSIP). The program has 87 projects, spanning seven counties, to repair, replace, and seismically upgrade aging portions of the Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System. To date the program is more than 90% complete.

A tremendous amount of work was done in the Sunol Valley to ensure a seismically reliable water supply for our Bay Area customers.  The Calaveras Fault runs right through the Sunol Valley. The Calaveras Dam Replacement Project is the largest WSIP Project in construction, but there have been many others. Here are the highlights:  





Alameda Siphon #4. A high tech pipeline crossing of the Calaveras Fault designed to survive an earthquake. Completed 2013.

















New Irvington Tunnel. A new seismically designed tunnel to connect the new Siphon with new pipelines in Fremont. Tunnel brought into service in 2015.













Upgrades to our Sunol Valley Water Treatment Plant to enable the plant to provide minimum demand to all of our 2.7 million customers on its own for up to 60 days. Completed 2015.
















A complete new Bay Division Pipeline #5 to connect the New Irvington Tunnel to a new Bay Tunnel and the Peninsula. Completed 2016.












We've been posting videos on Facebook all week to highlight the SFPUC's efforts to upgrade your infrastructure. And at Twitter: #TimetoBuild. See the Facebook posts  here.  

See you around the Valley!